Care Planning For Alzheimer’s & Dementia

Alzheimer's Dementia

Does the thought of the future for a loved one with dementia frighten you?  Dementia is a challenging condition to plan for because its onset may go initially unrecognized and its progression may be very slow. It is difficult to know when to tell your loved one that they can no longer do some of the things they have done for years such as driving.  Family caregivers gradually add a variety of responsibilities to their plates and it becomes difficult to tell when “just one more thing” will become too much.  The issues can be compounded if the individual with dementia wanders, becomes aggressive, or resistant to help.  Our logical selves want to take a rational approach with these individuals to try to help them understand the consequences of their actions.  While this method works well when teaching children, it is ineffective with persons with dementia.  What is to be done?

Alzheimer's Dementia 2

At Keystone Elder Law P.C., we help you understand the legal, financial, and social implications of dementia. Our team not only has technical knowledge about the legal and financial needs of individuals and their families but we also have personal experience with this condition.  The sooner a family seeks help from an elder law attorney, the greater the number of choices available to them for decision-making and care.  Instead of applying a common cookie-cutter process for each client, at Keystone, we look at the issues from a variety of perspectives.   In addition to the expertise of our attorneys, we have a Registered Nurse as an Elder Care Coordinator.   As a Registered Nurse, our Elder Care Coordinator brings a wealth of knowledge on medical conditions, the intricate healthcare system, and care facilities in the area providing advocacy for your loved one and extra support for you.

Alzheimer's Dementia 3

We encourage all individuals who are experiencing symptoms of dementia to visit their family physician for a complete check-up.  Symptoms of confusion and forgetfulness can sometimes be caused by treatable conditions such as infection, malnutrition, depression, and medication toxicity or interactions.  Once the underlying cause is taken care of, the symptoms disappear.  Dementia also may be due to a non-reversible condition such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, or vascular dementia.  When one of these conditions is present, we can help guide you through the maze of determining the correct level of care, finding professionals to provide the care, and figuring out how to pay for it.  At the same time, we will honor your loved one’s dignity and give you peace of mind.

For additional information or questions, give us a call at 717-697-3223